Nissan Leaf 2.zero 8000 miles update

I’ve now had my car just short of 6 months and have clocked up 8000 miles so I thought I’d give an update.

Money I’ve saved

I’ve spent a grand total of £23.42 on fuel since getting the car 😀 Compared to £50 every 5 days, this is quite a significant saving! Having said that… the car cost a small fortune, so it’ll be a while until I’ve saved enough on fuel to justify the cost of the car.

Long journeys

The two longest journeys I’ve completed are 120 miles driving down to Stratford to see the atletics and 127 miles to and from work + a trip out during the weekend.

The 120 miles to Stratford was the first long range journey I made. The car was fully charged when leaving home and I’d made a note of where to top up on the way home at a rapid Ecotricity if necessary. We went A1, M25, M11, with most of the A1 and M25 and M11 at a constant 63mph using adaptive cruse control. After the M11 the drive was a lot slower as we seemed to take a wrong turning so the majority of the drive from the M11 to Stratford was <30 mph.

On the way home, we had a slightly better route out of Stratford to the M11, but then found the M25 was shut before the A1, so took the M11 home. It was quite late so I decided to get home a little quicker by doing 70mph *cough* all the way up the M11 to our junction at Duxford. This cost us quite a bit on the consumption front but was a good test for the car and gave me great confidence in being able to get 120 miles out of the battery when not exactly driving conservatively. We arrived home with 120 miles on the clock + 20% left in the battery 🙂

The second slightly longer trip of 127 miles was a normal commute to and from work + a trip out to Yew Tree Alpacas. I’d driven home from work doing 70mph the whole way home as I was late. I got back to work three days later with 16% left in the battery. I was yet again impressed with the range given I wasn’t exactly driving conservatively!

Weird things I’ve found out

You can’t leave the driver’s door slightly ajar when moving the car! It jumps out of drive/reverse into park… This can also happen if you look around when reversing and the amount of pressure on the drivers seat detects no driver in the seat as mentioned by someone else in this thread I started on SpeakEV https://www.speakev.com/threads/jumped-out-of-gear-4-times-reversing-off-drive.124960/.

Scary moments!

I really like the adaptive cruise control, but you have to be aware at all times when it might “glitch”…

On the way to Stratford I was behind a lorry which was going a little slow at 55mph. I was aware there was going to be a gap in the traffic on my right after the car on my right had finished going past me, so I indicated right to pull into the lane and began to move (after the car on my right was about 1 cars length in front of me). Unfortunately the lorry in front of me had also moved into another lane and the adaptive cruise control noticed the lack of lorry and sped back up to 63mph just at the same moment I was moving into the right hand lane!! The car shot forward so fast I really don’t know how we missed the car in the right hand lane, but luckily I’d put my foot on the break to avoid the impact in front. That was a really scary moment! I realised immediately afterwards that I should have taken the car out of adaptive cruise control mode but it’s just one of those things that you can forget when moving lanes…

I’ve had quite a few of the… car in front goes into slip road on left, but adaptive cruise control is still tracking the car and when the car on the slip road slows down from 60mph to 10mph so does my car!! :/ <– not impressed face

Things I really like about the car

The 100% torque is really handy (if a little addictive)! Driving along at 60 and being able to put your foot down going to go around a lorry, not having to change down a gear to get the car to move is fantastic 🙂

I really like the drivers dashboard. There’s a massive range of displays to choose from (even if I mainly stick with the drive computer page) and it’s modern looking. I also particularly like the satnav popup on the drivers dashboard when using the Nissan satnav.

The blindspot warning is great – can’t see why all new cars don’t have this feature.

I think it takes less time each day to plug and unplug from the charge point than it did to queue and then fill up at the petrol station!

Things I’m not impressed/happy with…

I got really annoyed with the finance company. I made a large lump sum payment towards my loan and after 5 days of checking every day, the payment hadn’t registered in my online account portal. I emailed to find out if the payment had been received and when it would appear on the account and the response I got back said it could take up to the end of the month to show on my account!!

I got really angry with the response from RCI as it should not take more than 2 working days to process any payment and make it show on my account! How do I know whether I’m not being charged interest on the portion of money I’ve paid off? So I paid off the loan less than 30 days later.  I’d always planned to pay it off early (I’ve never kept a loan till the end of the agreement), but I kept it for less than 2 months in the end.

I’m finding the drivers seat gives me pains in my left leg in two points. It appears to be where the side wall of the seat contacts with my leg and there doesn’t appear to be any way to sit in the seat to avoid this. This problem is still ongoing.

Electric car charing points don’t tend to have a roof like petrol stations do, so if it’s raining and you need to plug in, you’re going to get wet 🙁  (Haha – my colleagues do laugh at this one!)

Would I buy the car again?

I’m torn on this…

Electric cars are definately the future and I won’t be going back to an ICE vehicle. However, whether I’d choose a Nissan again given the problem with the finance company, the lack of help from the dealer with the seat + the bits not working on the car when I got it – I’m not sure I would go Nissan again… That said, perhaps it was the dealer chain I bought the car from? I went to Letchworth recently to use their free charging point and the sales guy who moved the demonstrator out of the charge point spot was really helpful (helped me get my car on charge when I had issues with the charge point) + the service guy who came to look at the problem I had with one of the interior panels sorted a problem out there and then!

I had second thoughts on my car after getting it, thinking I’d trade it in for another car as soon as the 2019 Hyundai or KIA electric vehicle was released but I’ve decided to keep this one 🙂 So I guess that says it all… despite the problems, I’ve become attached to it.

Leaf 2.Zero 600 miles In

I’ve now had my car for a week and a half and have clocked up 600 miles. It’s been an interesting week since I wrote the last post and there’s a few things I’ve noticed with the car over that time…

The drivers sun visor is seriously small compared to the one I had in my 57 plate KIA cee’d! I drive North in the morning and South on the way home from work, so the sun is always on the right side of my face. The sun visor in the Nissan Leaf 2.Zero is so short when pushed around to the driver’s door side that it doesn’t even reach my forehead and therefore is effectively useless. I’ve had to “Blue Peter” style myself a workaround (a.k.a cut a box apart and stuff it into the sun visor holding strap – see below!).

I tested out the anti-lock braking for an Audi driver on the way home at a roundabout this week… I wasn’t going very fast when the Audi driver decided to try and go across the roundabout in front of me when he shouldn’t have. I’m guessing the ALB kicked in because of the weight of the car and the fact that I put my foot right down on the brake to stop the potential collision that was about to happen.

I got the TCU fixed by the dealer last weekend, but still couldn’t get the NissanConnect website to verify ownership. Sat in my car on three occasions and waited over 10 minutes with the whirley-gig saying checking, but no luck. Ended up emailing NissanConnect on Saturday and had to send them a copy of the V5 inside page but by Wednesday evening they’d verified I owned the vehicle and the service was activated. It’s not the greatest of apps – partly because it’s incredibly slow to send / receive requests from the car – but it’s useful to see remotely how much battery charge the vehicle has left and on the odd occasion switch the heating on.

When I took the vehicle to the dealer at the weekend, I also got them to check the faulty tyre pressure monitor. They reset the monitor from the car dashboard – not exactly what I’d hoped for and I thought it wouldn’t cure it. On the way home the warning re-appeared, so the car has to go back for a new sensor in April.

The adaptive cruise control is incredibly useful – I’ve used it on every journey I’ve made this week. It did take a bit of getting used to. The main thing was wondering why the car was going slowly one morning, only to remember it was matching the speed of the really slow car infront. I have found that on my long journey to and from work, when the cars in cruise control mode there’s nowhere to rest my right foot. The gap between the accelerator and the side of the car is too small to put my foot between. It’s therefore a little uncomfortable when driving for long periods of time on cruise control as I’m not sure where to rest my foot. If I move my leg towards the chair (as if I’m sitting at a table), I feel I’m not close enough to the pedals to react in time if there was a problem.

Scheduling the car to be warm when leaving work is awesome!! Not only is the company paying for my lovely warm car by way of the free electricity, but getting in a car preheated to 23.5C when it’s 5C outside is so nice 🙂

That’s it so far this week, but if I notice anything else in the coming weeks/months – I’ll be sure to put another post up.